​Another well know spice in the kitchen cinnamon is also known for it's medicinal properties. While not really an herb I still think it's important to list it in our list of herbs and their uses. Cinnamon actually comes from the inner bark of a tree in the laurel family. It's been used for centuries and was a hot commodity for trade in ancient times. In fact during the first century A.D. in Rome cinnamon was 15 times more expensive than silver. The Chinese were probably the first to use cinnamon as a medicinal herb and used it to treat fevers, and diarrhea. In more modern times cinnamon has been found to stabilize blood sugar levels in diabetics, as it has an insulin kind of effect.
This list contains notes of commonly used potencies, either by homeopaths or available in store-bought preparations. In clinical homeopathy, the choice of potency (dilution & succussion levels) to be used is determined by homeopathic practitioners or physicians on an individual basis. Some limit their use to the lower potencies of 4x (4D) through 30x (30D), while others use 3C through CM (100,000C) potencies.

The information on this page is provided by The Cancer Cure Foundation based on information we have received from a variety of sources, including the clinic itself, feedback from people who have gone to the clinic, and in some cases from clinic tours. The listing of a doctor or clinic here does not signify an endorsement by the Cancer Cure Foundation, unless we have indicated it. We encourage you to check out each clinic by visiting the clinic if possible, talking to people who have gone to the clinic (ask the clinic for contact information of people who have gone to the clinic), and by checking with other organizations as to what they know about the clinic. There are also some forums you can join to get feedback from others. We would also be happy to tell you what we know about any of these clinics.
Alternatively, make a steam bowl. To do this, fill a large bowl with hot water. Add herbs or essential oils, such as eucalyptus or rosemary, which may also relieve decongestion. Lean over the bowl and place a towel over the head. This traps the steam. Inhale the vapors for 5 minutes. If the steam feels hot on the skin, discontinue until the skin cools down.
Holistic Resource Center in Agoura Hills, CA - Dr. Alan Schwartz, MD. and a number of holistic practitioners including a chiropractor, naturopaths, homeopath, and a massage therapist. They can do bio-electrical screening, NAET allergy removal, and they provide nutritional support including IVs, diet programs, Poly MVA, PC SPES, homeopathy, and more. 818-597-0966 or fax 818-597-8668.

Catnip (Nepeta cataria) is usually taken as a tea to relax and calm a nervous system. Catnip can help ease a chronic cough, help you fall asleep and as a digestive aid. Some moms use catnip for colic babies or infants' teething. Moms also use catnip in tincture form at bedtime to help restless children sleep. Always check with your child's pediatrician or other medical practitioner before giving to your baby or child.
Cancer patients who choose alternative treatments instead of conventional treatments believe themselves less likely to die than patients who choose only conventional treatments.[15] They feel a greater sense of control over their destinies, and report less anxiety and depression.[15] They are more likely to engage in benefit finding, which is the psychological process of adapting to a traumatic situation and deciding that the trauma was valuable, usually because of perceived personal and spiritual growth during the crisis.[16]
Cayenne was used by Native Americans as a pain reliever and to halt infections. It was also used for toothache, arthritis and to aid digestion. This herb has anti-bacterial properties, can stimulate blood flow and is rich in vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. Many people consume cayenne to maintain cardiovascular health. Studies suggest that it may be able to reduce triglyceride levels and platelet aggregation in the blood.

Everyday Roots is intended for informational purposes only. Our site contains general information about medical conditions and treatments, and provides information and ideas for, but not limited to, natural and home remedies. Everyday Roots makes no claims that anything presented is true, accurate, proven, and/or not harmful to your health or wellbeing. Our website is not and does not claim to be written, edited, or researched by a health care professional. Any information on or associated with this website should NOT be considered a substitute for medical advice from a healthcare professional. If you are experiencing any form of health problem, always consult a doctor before attempting any treatment on your own. Everyday Roots will not be held liable or responsible in any way for any harm, injury, illness, or death that may result from the use of its content or anything related to it. Viewers assume all risk and liability associated with the use of the content on our site, and must agree to our terms and conditions.
Larrea tridentata Chaparral The leaves and twigs are used by Native Americans to make a herbal tea used for a variety of conditions, including arthritis, cancer and a number of others. Subsequent studies have been extremely variable, at best. Chaparral has also been shown to have high liver toxicity, and has led to kidney failure, and is not recommended for any use by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or American Cancer Society.[106][107]
​Even though it's more of a spice than an herb I couldn't help but include turmeric in the list of herbs. Turmeric has a long standing tradition in Hinduism and is associated with purity and cleansing. Still today Hindu brides will take part in a ceremony where they will cover their faces in a turmeric paste before taking their vows. Marco Polo once described turmeric as being a vegetable with qualities resembling that of saffron. It wasn't until about the mid 20th century when people from the west started to recognize turmeric for its medicinal benefits. Curcumin is the main ingredient found in turmeric that gives it these benefits, the concentration of curcumin in turmeric is around 3% this is why it is more beneficial to take an extract of turmeric.

"The oil serves many medicinal purposes, but one of the best-documented uses is for relaxation. The oil has a calming effect on people, and can be used to help induce sleep, ease frayed nerves, and promote a general sense of calmness and well being. It is great for those with nervousness or anxiety problems. Aside from having mental calming properties, chamomile is also good at relaxing sore muscles and tight joints.
Herbal medicine, also known as herbalism or botanical medicine, is a medical system based on the use of plants or plant extracts that may be eaten or applied to the skin. Since ancient times, herbal medicine has been used by many different cultures throughout the world to treat illness and to assist bodily functions. While herbal medicine is not a licensed profession in the United States, herbal remedies in the form of extracts, tinctures, capsules and tablets as well as teas may be recommended by healthcare practitioners of many different disciplines as a practical way to address a wide variety of medical conditions.
Bee Balm was often used by the Native Americans to treat intestinal problems, colic and flatulence. Tea made from this plant was used to induce sweating and break fevers. Bee balm is often used to treat the common cold and sore throat as well. The leaves of this plant are a good source of essential oil that contains thymol. Thymol is an antibiotic and often used as an ingredient in mouthwash. 
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