Stachytarpheta cayennensis Blue snakeweed Extracts of the plant are used to ease the symptoms of malaria. The boiled juice or a tea made from the leaves or the whole plant is taken to relieve fever and other symptoms. It is also used for dysentery, pain, and liver disorders.[158] A tea of the leaves is taken to help control diabetes in Peru and other areas.[159] Laboratory tests indicate that the plant has anti-inflammatory properties.[160]
So when a person has multiple rounds of chemotherapy and everyone is pleased because the tumor is shrinking, do not get too excited because what is usually happening is a killing of the non-stem cell and a production of a more aggressive growing cancer stem cell that is drug resistant. The term is MDR or multiple drug resistance. This is similar to when a person takes too many antibiotics and the bacteria grow stronger and more antibiotic resistant. The same happens with cancer stem cells. This is why people see a shrinking of tumors but then the cancer can return worse than ever before. This is because they did not change the internal environment to make it one that promotes health but instead they tried to kill their cancer cells.
Dill seeds and essential oils are used in Ayurvedic medicine. Dill seeds (Anethum graveolens L) are used to treat flatulence and stimulate appetite. Dill is also used as a diuretic. It can be given as a digestive tonic to help soothe indigestion. Mothers use dill essential oil for babies suffering from colic. Halitosis (bad breath) is treated by chewing dill seeds.
Hi. Back 12 months ago i had the miller fisher virus have been going on not to bad really been doing some work etc! Just lately been feeling like got a cold coming which i’m told is normal with this virus, the only thing is i’ve got this niggling chesty cough with fleum which is hard to move. Can anyone recommend anything herbal and safe i can use! Many thanks.
Standard medical care is medicine that is practiced by health professionals who hold an M.D. (medical doctor) or D.O. (doctor of osteopathy) degree. It is also practiced by other health professionals, such as physical therapists, physician assistants, psychologists, and registered nurses. Standard medicine may also be called biomedicine or allopathic, Western, mainstream, orthodox, or regular medicine. Some standard medical care practitioners are also practitioners of CAM.
Since the 1940s, medical science has developed chemotherapy, radiation therapy, adjuvant therapy and the newer targeted therapies, as well as refined surgical techniques for removing cancer. Before the development of these modern, evidence-based treatments, 90% of cancer patients died within five years.[2] With modern mainstream treatments, only 34% of cancer patients die within five years.[3] However, while mainstream forms of cancer treatment generally prolong life or permanently cure cancer, most treatments also have side effects ranging from unpleasant to fatal, such as pain, blood clots, fatigue, and infection.[4] These side effects and the lack of a guarantee that treatment will be successful create appeal for alternative treatments for cancer, which purport to cause fewer side effects or to increase survival rates despite evidence to suggest a 2.5 fold increase in death with alternative medicines.[5]

Herbal medicine is also a mainstay of naturopathic physicians (NDs or NMDs) who use natural approaches to promote wellness and treat disease. Naturopaths typically cannot prescribe pharmaceuticals, and not all practitioners have attended a four-year naturopathic medical school, so prospective patients should ask about training. You can locate a practitioner via the website of the American Association of Naturopathic Physicians. While some MDs and DOs (osteopathic physicians) are learning about herbs and other natural remedies, it is unlikely that herbal medicine was included in their formal training.


Eating a clove or two of fresh garlic a day may indeed keep the doctor away, in part because it has immune-boosting, antibacterial, antiviral, and anti-fungal effects. Many of garlic's therapeutic effects are derived from its sulfur-containing compounds, such as allicin, which are also what give it its characteristic smell. In general, garlic's benefits fall into four main categories:
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