​Witch hazel is an interesting herb that I've only recently found out about, it has been used for centuries by the Native Americans though.  When I was researching witch hazel I assumed that it got its name for warding off witches or something, but it actually was used as a witching stick for locating underground sources of water and or precious minerals. Witch hazel might not be considered an herb by some due to the fact it is a woody shrub, but it has very strong astringent and antiseptic properties so I just had to include it in the list of herbs along with its uses. Today you can find witch hazel in pretty much any drugstore in the form of witch hazel water (an alcohol extract of the twigs). The only problem with this is that most of the time the extract contains very little of the actual herb, and most of the effects might actually come from the alcohol itself.
The reason that patients using alternative treatments die sooner may be because patients who accurately perceive that they are likely to survive do not attempt unproven remedies, and patients who accurately perceive that they are unlikely to survive are attracted to unproven remedies.[17] Among patients who believe their condition to be untreatable by evidence-based medicine, "desperation drives them into the hands of anyone with a promise and a smile."[19] Con artists have long exploited patients' perceived lack of options to extract payments for ineffectual and even harmful treatments.[19]

Using a steam bath is a fantastic way to loosen congestion and hydrate a dry respiratory system, making this a useful home remedy for both dry coughs and chesty coughs. Add a few drops of essential oils like tea tree or eucalyptus to maximise these effects. Eucalyptus, along with peppermint, juniper, caraway and fennel oils can be found in our own Po-Ho oil.
Another very interesting alternative cancer treatment is Ukrain™. Formulated by Nowicky Pharma in Vienna, Austria, the anti-cancer drug is a semi-synthetic proprietary product which is an alkaloid extract from Chelidonium (common name Celandine). The medication is said to contain more than 40 alkaloids and is quickly absorbed by cancerous cells leading to rapid cancer-cell apoptosis. Primarily, it is given through IV as an alternative to chemotherapy for cancer patients and also has reported success with HIV and hepatitis patients.
The ability to synthesize a wide variety of chemical compounds that are used to perform important biological functions, and to defend against attack from predators such as insects, fungi and herbivorous mammals is called herbal medicine. Many of these phytochemicals have beneficial effects on long-term health when consumed by humans, and can be used to effectively treat human diseases. At least 12,000 such compounds have been isolated so far; a number estimated to be less than 10% of the total.[1][2]
​My personal favorite so far for promoting relaxation has got to be Valerian root. Like a lot of the others in this list of herbs Valerian was probably first used by the Greeks and Romans centuries ago. They used Valerian to treat disorders associated with the liver, urinary tract and digestive tract. Valerian was once used to treat people suffering from the plague. Your cat will love Valerian too! People use to use Valerian in sort of the same way we use catnip today. Some people said that you could judge the potency of the Valerian by the reaction the cat had to the herb. In addition to being a cat attractant rats are also found of the foul smell and it was once used in rat traps. Today Valerian root is most commonly found as a sleep aid and anxiety relief supplement. 

​Comfrey's use dates back centuries to at least the time of the ancient Greeks. During the Middle Ages comfrey was a widely cultivated herb found extensively in the gardens of monasteries. Throughout the 1700's and 1800's comfrey was also a popular herb grown in many gardens across Europe as well as America. Sometime during the late 1970's however research revealed that comfrey when taken internally can cause severe liver damage so it has lost popularity and internal use is even banned in many countries. Applications in the from of ointments, poultices, or creams are still considered safe though. Comfrey can still be found growing wild in central Europe, and the eastern United States as well as  a few western states.


While scientific research in this field is lacking, and most positive information is based on experience from patients, there has been some study into the effects of IPT. In an article appearing in the European Journal of Cancer and Clinical Oncology, Vol. 17, 1981, Alabaster et al. of the Cancer Research Laboratory, George Washington University, Washington, D.C. have published experimental results showing that insulin increases the cytotoxic effect of methotrexate in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells in vitro by a factor of up to ten thousand.
Acupressure Acupuncture Anthroposophic medicine Apitherapy Applied kinesiology Aromatherapy Auriculotherapy Bach flower remedies Bates method Biorhythm Black salve Bodywork Bonesetter Bowen technique Breathwork Cancer treatments Greek cancer cure Chiropractic Chiropractic treatment techniques Vertebral subluxation Christian Science Chromotherapy Colon cleansing Coffee enema Colorpuncture Craniosacral therapy Crystal healing Cupping therapy Detoxification Foot baths Duesberg hypothesis Ear candling Energy medicine Esoteric energy Therapeutic touch Eugenics Facilitated communication Functional medicine Hair analysis Herbal medicine Holistic dentistry Hologram bracelet Homeopathy Biological terrain assessment Hypnotherapy Iridology Ionized jewelry Lightning Process Lymphotherapy Medical intuitive Mesmerism Magnet therapy Manual therapy Mind–body interventions MMS Myofascial release NAET Naturopathy Oil pulling Orgone Orthomolecular medicine Megavitamin therapy Osteomyology Osteopathy Parapsychology Phrenology Psychic surgery Psychodermatology Radionics Rapid prompting method RBOP Reiki Reflexology Rolfing Scientific racism Thought Field Therapy Urine therapy Vision therapy Vitalism Zero balancing
This list contains notes of commonly used potencies, either by homeopaths or available in store-bought preparations. In clinical homeopathy, the choice of potency (dilution & succussion levels) to be used is determined by homeopathic practitioners or physicians on an individual basis. Some limit their use to the lower potencies of 4x (4D) through 30x (30D), while others use 3C through CM (100,000C) potencies.
On the other hand, pathological ketoacidosis is a consequence of other disease conditions such as poorly managed type one diabetes. In this case, the level of ketones will be in the range of 15 to 25 mM. These extremely high levels of ketones can be a serious health problem. The ketogenic diet does not produce this level of ketones. For a thorough discussion of the scientific literature related to the use of the ketogenic diet in cancer treatment I recommend the treatise on the subject by Dr. Thomas N. Seyfried, Cancer as a Metabolic Disease. [2]
It can ease menstrual cramps and back aches, as well as relax the digestive system to ease upset stomach or indigestion issues. When applied topically to the skin, it soothes redness and irritation. For this reason, it is a common ingredient in skincare. It also eliminates itchiness and is good for those with allergic reactions. Sometimes chamomile is used on rashes. Because of its anti-inflammatory properties, it can work to take down swelling caused by rashes or skin irritants."
Champlain Center for Natural Medicine in Shelburne, VT is run by Bill Warnock, ND, Lorilee Schoenbeck, ND, and Simon Frishkoff, ND. They treat cancer - all stages, multiple sclerosis, HIV/AIDS, arthritis, Wilson's Syndrome and chronic fatigue. They may use a variety of approaches - homeopathic, anthroposophical, acupuncture, botanic, nutritional, bee venom therapies, and mistletoe. They work with patients who want alternative or integrated approaches to help their immune system while doing or after chemo or other conventional approaches. http://www.vtnaturalmed.com (802) 985-8250

Stachytarpheta cayennensis Blue snakeweed Extracts of the plant are used to ease the symptoms of malaria. The boiled juice or a tea made from the leaves or the whole plant is taken to relieve fever and other symptoms. It is also used for dysentery, pain, and liver disorders.[158] A tea of the leaves is taken to help control diabetes in Peru and other areas.[159] Laboratory tests indicate that the plant has anti-inflammatory properties.[160]
Homeopathy medicines address iron deficiency naturally and effectively which is the most common cause of low hemoglobin levels as per National Anemia Action Council in the United states. This causes body to produce fewer red blood cells causing blood depletion and might need transfusion if condition is severe. Homeopathy medicines and tonics that are rich… Continue reading Iron deficiency Anemia Treatment – Top Homeopathy Medicines, Food
Korean ginseng is an adaptogen. An adaptogen can help your body and mind handle stress better. This is an energizing herb often taken by people to ward off fatigue, increase strength, stamina and sharpen mental abilities. This herb is believed to lower cholesterol and may be helpful in treating diabetes and depression. Korean ginseng is a good immune system booster. Since it has a warming effect on the body, it’s best taken in the winter months.
Magaziner Medical Center in Cherry Hill is run by Allan Magaziner, D.O., P.C. He mainly treats prostate, breast, lung, and bowel cancers; but he also treats Alzheimer's, multiple sclerosis and heart problems. He uses oral and IV vitamins, minerals, amino acids, oral botanicals, herbs, enzymes, homeopathic remedies, chelation, and detoxification. His website is www.drmagaziner.com. 856-424-8222
Essence Of The Spirit Retreat in Caldwell, Ohio is run by Randy and May Huffman. The retreat is free, but they do accept donations. They use Lee Crock's Energy Stimulator to help the body heal itself. Information on this device is available at http://www.keelynet.com/biology/crock.htm (Note: They do not specifically treat cancer, though some people appear to have been helped by this machine. This is a facility where one can experiment with an approach that has not been evaluated and approved. Guests should be under the care and responsibility of a physician as there are no persons available with the medical knowledge that are permitted to administer any form of medical attention.) They can be reached by phone at (740) 783-0021.

These phytochemicals are divided into (1) primary metabolites such as sugars and fats, which are found in all plants; and (2) secondary metabolites – compounds which are found in a smaller range of plants, serving a more specific function.[3] For example, some secondary metabolites are toxins used to deter predation and others are pheromones used to attract insects for pollination. It is these secondary metabolites and pigments that can have therapeutic actions in humans and which can be refined to produce drugs—examples are inulin from the roots of dahlias, quinine from the cinchona, morphine and codeine from the poppy, and digoxin from the foxglove.[3]
Maine Whole Health in Portland Maine is run by Alan N.Weiner, DO, CCN. Alan N.Weiner is certified in clinical nutrition and has experience in treating cancer with a variety of alternative modalities. Devra Krassner, ND also works at the clinic. They guide you in bridging conventional and complementary cancer therapies. They use diet and nutrition programs to enhance the immune system, detoxification, IVs, supplements, homeopathy, herbal and botanical medicine, a complete mind/body approach - Psychoneuroimmunology (PNI), and guided imagery. - 207-828-5645 http://www.mainewholehealth.com/.
​Next on our list of herbs is Echinacea also known as Black Sampson it is referred to by the native Americans of the plains as snake root, because it was traditionally used to treat snake bites. Natives have also used the plant to treat tooth aches. The Omaha-Ponca and Cheyenne Indians were probably the most notable groups to use the plant. They would rub the juices of the roots on their bodies to heal burns, or like mentioned above would use it to treat toothaches. Today echinacea is used to boost the immune system and speed up recovery of the common cold. There are three common types of Echinacea; Echinacea purpurea is the most common it can be found from Georgia to Oklahoma, north to Michigan and east to Ohio. Echinacea pallida is most commonly found in open woods and prairies, people in states like Michigan, Arkansas, Texas and here in Nebraska can find this species of Echinacea. Echinacea angustifolia tends to grow on roadsides, prairies, and outcrops; people living in Texas all the way north through the Dakotas and southern Saskatchewan you can also expect to find it growing in Montana and Colorado.

When using Aloe you want to be sure not to apply it to any open wounds. Also be careful when processing the leaves. As I mentioned above you want to make use of the clear gel part, and steer clear of the yellow sap​ that oozes out. While not a big deal when applying to the skin one should be aware of this yellow sap when taking aloe gel orally. This yellow sap is called aloin and if ingested will act as a laxative, if aloin is used for prolonged periods it can lead to depletion of electrolytes and dependence for normal bowl function.

Ashwagandha is sometimes called “Indian ginseng” as it has many similar health properties. This herb is very popular in the Ayurvedic system of health in India. It is considered an adaptogen. It is commonly used to relieve stress and strengthen the immune system. It has the ability to strengthen the body and increase endurance. This herb has been used in India for over 3,000 years as a rejuvenator. The seeds of this plant are thought to have a diuretic effect, while the leaves possess anti-inflammatory, analgesic and sedative properties. The chemical components of the root have anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, immune strengthening and sedative properties. This is a great herb for athletes and active people that need to increase their energy, strength and stamina.
Eating a clove or two of fresh garlic a day may indeed keep the doctor away, in part because it has immune-boosting, antibacterial, antiviral, and anti-fungal effects. Many of garlic's therapeutic effects are derived from its sulfur-containing compounds, such as allicin, which are also what give it its characteristic smell. In general, garlic's benefits fall into four main categories:
Feverfew leaves (Tanacetum parthenium) are used as a tincture or a capsule. It's administered for migraine headaches and feverish chills. It is sometimes recommended for arthritis. Older traditional medicine required patients to chew the leaves (can cause mouth ulcers), but many modern treatments use tinctures. Pregnant women should never use feverfew since it cause uterine contractions. Avoid if you suffer from stomach ulcers or gallbladder issues. If you suffer from ragweed allergies, avoid feverfew.
A 2005 study on the anti-diabetic effect of garlic in normal and lab-induced diabetic rats, published in the journal Phytomedicine, found that oral administration significantly decreased serum glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides, urea, uric acid, creatinine, AST and ALT levels. While it increased serum insulin in diabetic rats, this was not so in the case of normal rats. It concluded that garlic must be considered as an excellent candidate for future human studies on diabetes mellitus. What’s better, garlic also helps reduce high cholesterol levels, a complication that diabetics often face. This makes it an excellent spice to use for in all recipes!
These phytochemicals are divided into (1) primary metabolites such as sugars and fats, which are found in all plants; and (2) secondary metabolites – compounds which are found in a smaller range of plants, serving a more specific function.[3] For example, some secondary metabolites are toxins used to deter predation and others are pheromones used to attract insects for pollination. It is these secondary metabolites and pigments that can have therapeutic actions in humans and which can be refined to produce drugs—examples are inulin from the roots of dahlias, quinine from the cinchona, morphine and codeine from the poppy, and digoxin from the foxglove.[3]
​Another well know spice in the kitchen cinnamon is also known for it's medicinal properties. While not really an herb I still think it's important to list it in our list of herbs and their uses. Cinnamon actually comes from the inner bark of a tree in the laurel family. It's been used for centuries and was a hot commodity for trade in ancient times. In fact during the first century A.D. in Rome cinnamon was 15 times more expensive than silver. The Chinese were probably the first to use cinnamon as a medicinal herb and used it to treat fevers, and diarrhea. In more modern times cinnamon has been found to stabilize blood sugar levels in diabetics, as it has an insulin kind of effect.
Stachytarpheta cayennensis Blue snakeweed Extracts of the plant are used to ease the symptoms of malaria. The boiled juice or a tea made from the leaves or the whole plant is taken to relieve fever and other symptoms. It is also used for dysentery, pain, and liver disorders.[158] A tea of the leaves is taken to help control diabetes in Peru and other areas.[159] Laboratory tests indicate that the plant has anti-inflammatory properties.[160]
Carbohydrates break down into glucose in the small intestine which is then absorbed into the bloodstream. Spices like Cayenne pepper stimulate glucose absorption from the small intestine, according to a Hungarian study published in the March 18, 2006 issue of the “European Journal of Pharmacology”. Add a bit to cayenne pepper to your home-cooked meals to stabilize your blood sugar levels naturally. The entire pepper family – including bell peppers, chilli peppers, and cayenne are known to help fight inflammation. That is why they are prized in several Asian culinary traditions. Use Cayenne wisely to get its anti-inflammatory benefits as well. 

So when a person has multiple rounds of chemotherapy and everyone is pleased because the tumor is shrinking, do not get too excited because what is usually happening is a killing of the non-stem cell and a production of a more aggressive growing cancer stem cell that is drug resistant. The term is MDR or multiple drug resistance. This is similar to when a person takes too many antibiotics and the bacteria grow stronger and more antibiotic resistant. The same happens with cancer stem cells. This is why people see a shrinking of tumors but then the cancer can return worse than ever before. This is because they did not change the internal environment to make it one that promotes health but instead they tried to kill their cancer cells.
Stachytarpheta cayennensis Blue snakeweed Extracts of the plant are used to ease the symptoms of malaria. The boiled juice or a tea made from the leaves or the whole plant is taken to relieve fever and other symptoms. It is also used for dysentery, pain, and liver disorders.[158] A tea of the leaves is taken to help control diabetes in Peru and other areas.[159] Laboratory tests indicate that the plant has anti-inflammatory properties.[160]
The great fear of the pharmaceutical industry, and the vast cancer treatment system that it controls, is that a non-patentable and inexpensive cure for cancer might put them out of business. Sadly, these organizations exist to turn a profit from cancer treatment, which is measured in the billions of dollars every year. They are in the business of treating cancer not curing it.

Kava has been used by the people of the Pacific islands for hundreds of years as a natural anti-anxiety treatment. It has a very calming effect and puts most people in a good mood. It has also been used as a diuretic and to treat urinary problems, arthritis, asthma and upset stomach. It is very popular in Germany and often prescribed as the first line of treatment for anxiety disorders.


Lightly bruise the thyme, e.g. with a mortar and pestle, and then place in a mug. Cover with 8 ounces of boiling water, cover, and let it steep for 10-15 minutes. Add some lemon or honey to taste, and drink the whole thing. Repeat 2-3 times daily as needed. It’s absolutely delightful just before bedtime (unless you aren’t a fan of thyme. But drink some anyways.)
Dry air can particularly worsen a dry, irritating cough, so getting an air humidifier can be really useful! Alternatively, you can place a bowl of water on your radiator so that as it warms it releases moisture into the air. Just be careful that your home doesn’t get too humid, as this could cause damp and mould which aren't good for a cough either! 
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