​Stinging nettles are an interesting herb that we have growing rampant here in Nebraska. Stinging nettles are probably best known for... you guessed it their sting. The nettle plant has  sharp spines that are revealed upon contact and once they penetrate the skin of the victim they release a concoction of chemicals into the body. This is where you get that burning/itchy feeling from, the nettle plant releases a mix of histamine, acetylcholine, serotonin, and formic acid. Surprisingly the treatment for this burning sensation can be found via the plant itself; the juice from the nettle's leaves can be applied to the affected area. Aside from the painful sting of the nettle plant it is actually a very beneficial herb and undoubtedly deserves to be in our list of herbs here. 

​Even though it's more of a spice than an herb I couldn't help but include turmeric in the list of herbs. Turmeric has a long standing tradition in Hinduism and is associated with purity and cleansing. Still today Hindu brides will take part in a ceremony where they will cover their faces in a turmeric paste before taking their vows. Marco Polo once described turmeric as being a vegetable with qualities resembling that of saffron. It wasn't until about the mid 20th century when people from the west started to recognize turmeric for its medicinal benefits. Curcumin is the main ingredient found in turmeric that gives it these benefits, the concentration of curcumin in turmeric is around 3% this is why it is more beneficial to take an extract of turmeric.

Here you get the soothing qualities of warming ginger, all wrapped up in a delicious easy to swallow cough syrup. Spicy ginger works as an expectorant, helping loosen and expel mucous from the lungs. It can also stop the painful tickle at the back of throat that can trigger a cough if the first place, if you are experiencing a dry cough. The peppermint will also help relieve the irritating tickle of a cough.
There are actually several ways to use lemon balm making it a versatile herb both in the ailments it treats and  the way it can be administered. Teas are a great way to gain the benefits of lemon balm. You can steep about 5 or 6 fresh leaves in a cup of water for six minutes and strain. Try adding some honey or stevia to sweeten the deal up and add a little mint for an extra layer of flavor. Tinctures, extracts, and ointments are all also widely available for lemon balm and all are quite effective.
The CSC hypothesis has important clinical implications for cancer therapeutics because of the suggested role of CSCs in chemoresistance (Kakarala and Wicha, 2008). There is increasing evidence that CSCs are naturally resistant to chemotherapy on account of their quiescence, more efficient DNA repair, resistance to apoptosis and expression of drug-resistance proteins, such as ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABCG2 and ABCG5) and multidrug-resistance protein 1 transporters (Dean et al, 2005). If this is correct, a small population of chemoresistant CSCs may resist killing by conventional chemotherapy, whereas majority of tumour cells, which are differentiated cells that lack ‘stemness’, may be killed. The tumour could, therefore, regrow after chemotherapy because of the capacity for self-renewal of these CSCs.
Most studies of complementary and alternative medicine in the treatment of cancer pain are of low quality in terms of scientific evidence. Studies of massage therapy have produced mixed results, but overall show some temporary benefit for reducing pain, anxiety, and depression and a very low risk of harm, unless the patient is at risk for bleeding disorders.[34][35] There is weak evidence for a modest benefit from hypnosis, supportive psychotherapy and cognitive therapy. Results about Reiki and touch therapy were inconclusive. The most studied such treatment, acupuncture, has demonstrated no benefit as an adjunct analgesic in cancer pain. The evidence for music therapy is equivocal, and some herbal interventions such as PC-SPES, mistletoe, and saw palmetto are known to be toxic to some cancer patients. The most promising evidence, though still weak, is for mind–body interventions such as biofeedback and relaxation techniques.[36]

New Hope Medical Center in Scottsdale uses alternative methods to treat immune deficient illnesses such as cancer. Dr. Fredda Branyon, Director, and Dr. Mario Galaburri, NMD, agree that a physician should never just treat the symptoms of the illness, but treat the individual as a whole. Dr. Ronald Peters, MD, MPH, has also joined the New Hope team, reinforcing New Hope Medical Center’s commitment to offer its patients an aggressive, non-invasive approach to the treatment of cancer and other auto-immune diseases. Dr. Peters has 15 years of experience in integrative medicine and nutritional biochemistry, with special emphasis in the treatment and prevention of chronic disease. Phone (480) 556-0182, toll free: (888) 518-7788, or go to their website at http://www.newhopemedicalcenter.com/.
St. John’s Wort is known as Nature’s anti-depressant. It is often used to treat depression and anxiety. It functions as an SSRI (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor). This allows more serotonin to stay where it’s needed to keep you feeling less depressed and anxious. This herb is also used to help quit smoking. St. John’s work possesses antiviral properties and can be used externally to treat wounds.
​Also known as pot marigold or poet's marigold, calendula is different than the common marigold that's usually seen in gardens. Unlike the common marigold calendula is edible and has very little scent. During medieval time in England the calendula herb was commonly used in stews, syrups, and breads. Calendula is also rather easy to start from seed and is able to adapt to many growing conditions making it an ideal herb to grow. The herb is found in many gardens all over the world for subarctic to tropic regions. Now let's take a look at the key medicinal uses that make calendula such a prized herb to have.
Ilex paraguariensis Yerba mate It has been claimed to have various effects on human health and these effects have been attributed to the high quantity of polyphenols found in mate tea.[97] Mate contains compounds that act as an appetite suppressant,[98] increases mental energy and focus,[99] and improves mood.[100] Yerba mate also contains elements such as potassium, magnesium, and manganese.[101]
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