The ability to synthesize a wide variety of chemical compounds that are used to perform important biological functions, and to defend against attack from predators such as insects, fungi and herbivorous mammals is called herbal medicine. Many of these phytochemicals have beneficial effects on long-term health when consumed by humans, and can be used to effectively treat human diseases. At least 12,000 such compounds have been isolated so far; a number estimated to be less than 10% of the total.[1][2]
Feverfew leaves (Tanacetum parthenium) are used as a tincture or a capsule. It's administered for migraine headaches and feverish chills. It is sometimes recommended for arthritis. Older traditional medicine required patients to chew the leaves (can cause mouth ulcers), but many modern treatments use tinctures. Pregnant women should never use feverfew since it cause uterine contractions. Avoid if you suffer from stomach ulcers or gallbladder issues. If you suffer from ragweed allergies, avoid feverfew.
Acne Adaptogen Aid Digestion Allergies Anti-Aging Anti-bacterial Antioxidant Anxiety Arthritis Articles Asthma Blood Circulation Blood Pressure Blood Sugar Cancer Cholesterol Common Cold Concentration Constipation Depression Diabetes Diarrhea Energy Fatigue Flu Free Radicals Ginseng High Cholesterol Immune System Increase stamina Indigestion Inflammation Insomnia Liver Longevity Memory Menopause Nervous System Psoriasis Skin Conditions Stress Tumors Ulcers Weight Loss Wound Healing
So if the cells have a God given wisdom to transform into cancer stem cells to adapt to a toxic environment then how can you cause the cancer stem cells to revert back into normal cells? Is this done by adding more toxins like chemotherapy or by removing the toxic load and upgrading the performance of all systems, glands and organs? The answer is obvious. Cancer cells are not some foreign invader that should be killed.
Anyone can claim to be an herbalist, so be sure to look for someone with extensive training. Practitioners of both Traditional Chinese Medicine and ayurvedic medicine rely on herbs for treatment. You may be able to find a knowledgeable practitioner through the American Herbalist Guild. Keep in mind that professional herbalists who advise clients on the use of medicinal herbs are typically not licensed to diagnose or treat disease.
Chinese medicine has been using cinnamon for medicinal purposes for hundreds of years. It has been the subject of numerous studies to determine its effect on blood glucose levels. A 2011 study has shown that cinnamon, in whole form or extract, helps lower fasting blood glucose levels. More studies are being done, but cinnamon is showing promise for helping to treat diabetes.
Suma is often called Brazilian ginseng due to it’s ability to increase strength and stamina. Like all adaptogens, suma is good for reducing the ill effects of stress. This herb balances the hormones and is commonly taken to strengthen the adrenal glands. Suma contains germanium and so can boost the immune system. It contains many vitamins and minerals and has anti-inflammatory properties as well.
Making creams, lotions, ointments, salves and soaps are the most common ways to use the calendula herb. Calendula has been used for centuries to treat skin conditions and infections in some minor wounds. The calendula herb can also be taken orally to help ease upset stomachs, ulcers and fevers as well. Most often you will see calendula applied externally to treat minor cuts, burns, bug bites and more. If you're using it to treat digestive disorders using the petals to make a tea or tincture is a great way to treat peptic ulcers and gastrointestinal infection. It's recommended that you take 3-5 grams a day to help ease these digestive disorders.
About half the practitioners who dispense complementary treatments are physicians, although they tend to be generalists rather than oncologists. As many as 60% of American physicians have referred their patients to a complementary practitioner for some purpose.[7] While conventional physicians should always be kept aware of any complementary treatments used by a patient, many physicians in the United Kingdom are at least tolerant of their use, and some might recommend them.[10]
Hoxsey Therapy is a mixture of herbs which cures cancer. It began to be sold in 1920s by Mr. Harry Hoxsey. Mr. Hoxsey said that the treatment came from his great-grandfather, who observed a horse with a tumor on its leg cure itself by grazing upon certain wild plants. John Hoxsey gathered these herbs and mixed them with other folk remedies that were used for cancer. The therapy aims to restore physiological normalcy to a disturbed metabolism throughout the body, and to help detoxify the consequences of cancer. At one point, Mr. Harry Hoxsey had 17 clinics located in the United States. He was shut down by the US FDA. A clinic now exists in Mexico.

Robert Jay Rowen, MD has moved from Alaska to Santa Rosa, CA. You can reach him at 707-571-7560. He treats most forms of cancer, as well as treating chronic pain, immune dysfunction, allergies, and cardiovascular disease. The main therapies he uses includes: IPT therapy, chelation, bio-oxidative, nutrition, herbs, acupuncture, immune therapies, vitamin C, vaccines, and detoxification. He is not using laetrile in California. We understand he enjoys treating later stage cancers. His website is http://www.doctorrowen.com, and his email is drrowen@att.net.
Studies, such as one conducted at Penn State College of Medicine, have found that honey can work more efficiently to calm a cough than over-the-counter drugs. It is a rich demulcent, with a high viscosity and stickiness that does an incredible job of coating and soothing those irritated mucous membranes. Thanks to an enzyme added by bees when they harvest honey, it also has antibacterial properties as well, which may help shorten how long you have the cough if it is due to bacterial illness.

An aromatic herb that is used commonly to add flavor and aroma to meats and soups, Rosemary also helps normalize blood sugar levels naturally. It promotes weight loss as well, which is a double boon for many diabetics who struggle with weight issues. A research conducted in Jordan to study the effects of rosemary on lipid profile in diabetic rats proved that rosemary has no significant influence on serum glucose level and lipid profile of normal rats. But when rosemary extract was administered to diabetic rats for 4 weeks, their blood sugar levels reduced by 20%, cholesterol levels by 22%, triglyceride levels by 24%, and LDL by 27% while HDL increased by 18% respectively. The study was published in African Journal of Plant Science Vol. 6 in 2012.
When using Aloe you want to be sure not to apply it to any open wounds. Also be careful when processing the leaves. As I mentioned above you want to make use of the clear gel part, and steer clear of the yellow sap​ that oozes out. While not a big deal when applying to the skin one should be aware of this yellow sap when taking aloe gel orally. This yellow sap is called aloin and if ingested will act as a laxative, if aloin is used for prolonged periods it can lead to depletion of electrolytes and dependence for normal bowl function.
Teas are a great way to get the benefits of sage all you need to do is steep one teaspoon of sage in a cup of water for about 10 minutes. You can also make a pretty awesome sore throat reliever by combining sage and thyme. Take an ounce of both grind them, and cover them with 16 ounces of apple cider vinegar. Be sure to shake it periodically and let it sit for ten days before using.
Gymnema Sylvestre is a vine native to Central & South India. Used in traditional Indian medicine since the 6th century BC, the leaves of this plant contain ‘gymnemic acids’ that have the amazing ability to slow down the transport of glucose from the intestines to the bloodstream. Some scientists even believe that Gymnema Sylvestre extract can help repair and regenerate pancreatic beta cells that produce insulin!
Cancer is characterized by unrestrained proliferation and loss of organization, a process that is intimately linked to, and controlled by, reciprocal signaling between the genetically altered tumor epithelium, the stroma, the components of the basement membrane and inflammatory mediators. Much work has been done to characterize the genetics of cancer cells. In this review, we describe the experiments that have been performed, which point to the significant role of the tissue microenvironment in the developmental regulation of normal and neoplastic cells. Using a variety of model systems, the works of a number of laboratories have converged on a hypothesis where the correction of 1 or 2 signaling defects can revert tumor cells to a normal phenotype, both in vivo and in culture, even when the tumor cells possess multiple genetic and epigenetic lesions. This paradigm has been successfully used to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia, and it remains the task of biomedical researchers to identify additional targets for the reversion of other human malignancies.
Robert Jay Rowen, MD has moved from Alaska to Santa Rosa, CA. You can reach him at 707-571-7560. He treats most forms of cancer, as well as treating chronic pain, immune dysfunction, allergies, and cardiovascular disease. The main therapies he uses includes: IPT therapy, chelation, bio-oxidative, nutrition, herbs, acupuncture, immune therapies, vitamin C, vaccines, and detoxification. He is not using laetrile in California. We understand he enjoys treating later stage cancers. His website is http://www.doctorrowen.com, and his email is drrowen@att.net. 

Standard medical care is medicine that is practiced by health professionals who hold an M.D. (medical doctor) or D.O. (doctor of osteopathy) degree. It is also practiced by other health professionals, such as physical therapists, physician assistants, psychologists, and registered nurses. Standard medicine may also be called biomedicine or allopathic, Western, mainstream, orthodox, or regular medicine. Some standard medical care practitioners are also practitioners of CAM.

Stellaria media Common chickweed It has been used as a remedy to treat itchy skin conditions and pulmonary diseases.[161] 17th century herbalist John Gerard recommended it as a remedy for mange. Modern herbalists prescribe it for iron-deficiency anemia (for its high iron content), as well as for skin diseases, bronchitis, rheumatic pains, arthritis and period pain.[162]
CAUTION: Pregnant and nursing women should not eat alfalfa seeds due to their content of stachydrine and homostachydrine (may promote menstruation or cause miscarriage). People in general should never eat alfalfa seeds. They contain high levels of the toxic amino acid canavanine. Alfalfa is high in vitamin K and may work as an anti-coagulant so it shouldn’t be taken by people taking blood thinning medication.
Centers for Integrative and Complementary Medicine in New York is run by Dr. Dr. Fred Pescatore, who has worked along side Dr. Atkins. Dr. Pescatore treats patients with AIDS, diabetes, heart disease, hepatitis, and cancer—in addition to addressing more common concerns such as diet and nutrition—by employing a combination of both alternative and traditional medicines. 212-779-2944.
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