The remainder of this article is divided into three sections. The first describes some of the alternative cures for cancer that have been successfully used by many thousands of people. The second section describes some of the steps that you can take to prevent cancer from developing or reoccurring. The third section describes how to avoid exposing yourself to things that will increase your risk for developing cancer.
You can use Chamomile oil taken from the flowers (Anthemis nobilis) to use in a topical application for joint pain or muscle cramps. A soothing and relaxing herb, chamomile is a great anti-anxiety treatment when taken as a tea. Chamomile tea is excellent for migraines and is used to regulate menstrual periods. (However, avoid giving to infants and children. Avoid if you're allergic to pollen.)
​Lavender is probably best noted for its fragrance and is a great herb to use for a stressful day. The lavender is commonly used in soaps, detergents, or just as an essential oil due to the calming effects it produces from the fragrance. Lavender is also commonly used in teas for the same reason. The history of lavender is quite long stretching back about 2500 years to the Mediterranean. Today it is mostly grown for its uses as an essential oil. In addition to brewing tea with lavender it also ha many other culinary types of uses, lavender can add a floral type of taste with a little sweetness. It works great in some seafood, soups, salads, and baked goods.
Over several decades, our understanding of the pathogenesis of neoplasia has been advanced tremendously. Many oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes have been identified and characterized, and it is usually accepted that cancer is a genetic disease. Nevertheless, it is beginning to be appreciated that the interrelationships between the tumor epithelium and the tissue microenvironment play a critical role in tumorigenesis. It has been demonstrated the ability of the tissue microenvironment to control malignancy and the mechanisms of tumor initiation, progression and regression.
The purpose of this page is to educate you on what alternative and integrative cancer therapy really IS. We will be sharing news on alternative cancer treatments that is not focused on killing cancer cells with chemicals and radiation but instead working to balance the systems of the body so it can do what God designed it to do from the beginning – heal naturally
Feverfew leaves (Tanacetum parthenium) are used as a tincture or a capsule. It's administered for migraine headaches and feverish chills. It is sometimes recommended for arthritis. Older traditional medicine required patients to chew the leaves (can cause mouth ulcers), but many modern treatments use tinctures. Pregnant women should never use feverfew since it cause uterine contractions. Avoid if you suffer from stomach ulcers or gallbladder issues. If you suffer from ragweed allergies, avoid feverfew.
Stellaria media Common chickweed It has been used as a remedy to treat itchy skin conditions and pulmonary diseases.[161] 17th century herbalist John Gerard recommended it as a remedy for mange. Modern herbalists prescribe it for iron-deficiency anemia (for its high iron content), as well as for skin diseases, bronchitis, rheumatic pains, arthritis and period pain.[162]
Plantain has a pretty lengthy list of uses it can be used to treat acne by applying a salve or tincture to the area, crushing the leaves can make for an effective sunburn remedy. Just from these two uses alone you can see that plantain would make a great herb for any prepper, but the benefits of plantain don't stop there. The ability that plantain has for treating cuts and healing wounds makes it a great herb to know when in the wilderness and to keep in your herbal first aid kit. Plantain can also be used to treat colds, the flu, and respiratory infections by brewing a tea with it.
Paul, I. M., Beiler, J., McMonagle, A., Shaffer, M. L., Duda, L., & Berlin Jr, C. M. (2007, December). Effect of honey, dextromethorphan, and no treatment on nocturnal cough and sleep quality for coughing children and their parents. Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, 161(12), 1,140–1,146. Retrieved from https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/fullarticle/571638
Used by the ancient Egyptians for fever and chills, chamomile is still in wide use today. This plant is used for colic, indigestion, flatulence, bloating heartburn and to calm nervousness. Chamomile has anti-inflammatory, antifungal, antiseptic, antibacterial and antispasmodic properties. Some people suffering from peptic ulcers find relief from drinking chamomile tea.
St. John’s Wort is known as Nature’s anti-depressant. It is often used to treat depression and anxiety. It functions as an SSRI (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor). This allows more serotonin to stay where it’s needed to keep you feeling less depressed and anxious. This herb is also used to help quit smoking. St. John’s work possesses antiviral properties and can be used externally to treat wounds.
Partners in Wellness in Cincinnati - Leonid Macheret, M.D., is a general practice doctor who treats cancer and also arthritis, cardiovascular disorders, hypoglycemia, metabolic disorders, diabetes, fibromyalgia, and he also does preventive medicine. He uses chelation, acupuncture, nutrition, orthomolecular, ethnic herbs, Ayurvedic, yoga, and osteopathic manipulation. Phone: 513-851-8790.
Eating a clove or two of fresh garlic a day may indeed keep the doctor away, in part because it has immune-boosting, antibacterial, antiviral, and anti-fungal effects. Many of garlic's therapeutic effects are derived from its sulfur-containing compounds, such as allicin, which are also what give it its characteristic smell. In general, garlic's benefits fall into four main categories:
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