As you might expect from an herb like basil it has a pretty profound effect on the digestive system and therefore works great for treating things like indigestion, bloating, and gas. When you're using basil to treat these problems I'd recommend taking around 2-4 grams per day taken orally. Basil can also be used to ease the effects of insect bites and stings, simply crush the leaves so the juices can be applied to the affected area. To help from getting bit or stung in the first place you can rub the juice on the skin in the same manner, basil works rather well as an insecticide so this should help repel the bugs.
Foundation for Cartilage and Immunology Research uses bovine cartilage is used as a first-line therapy where other modalities are of little or no value, such as cancer of the pancreas, adenocarcinoma of the lung, squamous cell cancer of the pharynx, lung, larynx (metastatic), renal cell carcinoma, and others. It is used as a reserve therapy in malignancies for which there are standard therapies of recognized effectiveness, such as breast, gastrointestinal, or prostate cancer. Phone: (914)763-6195.
​Lemon balm is another herb with a potent fragrance, rubbing the leaves releases a somewhat minty and lemony scent into the air. First used by the Greeks over 2000 years ago lemon balm has a long standing use in herbal medicine. Back then the Greeks as well as the Romans would infuse there wine with the lemon balm to relieve fevers. Today lemon balm is often paired with other herbs such as valerian and hops for sleep promotion and relaxation. Its gaining popularity as some what of a nootropic as well, some studies have shown it to improve learning, and memory recall too. So its no surprise that a lot of herbal practitioners are recommending lemon balm as a treatment to Alzheimer's.
The moment a patient is put on the full therapy, the combined effect of the food, the juices and the medication causes the immune system to attack and kill tumor tissue, besides working to flush out accumulated toxins from the body tissues. This great clearing-out procedure carries the risk of overburdening and poisoning the liver — the all-important organ of detoxification, which, in a cancer patient, is bound to be already damaged and debilitated.
Yes. When taking medication, you should investigate possible interactions with an herbal remedy you may be considering. Be careful about mixing herbs and drugs that have similar actions. For example, it may not be a good idea to mix anticoagulant drugs with ginkgo, a natural blood thinner; the herb valerian, a sedative, probably shouldn’t be mixed with prescription sleeping pills. Similarly, avoid mixing herbs and drugs that have opposite actions. Other agents may alter the way a medication is handled by the body. For example, St. John’s wort, a natural remedy for depression, may reduce the effectiveness of some drugs by causing them to be metabolized too quickly. When in doubt, check with your pharmacist about herb/drug interactions. In addition, herbs that can thin blood, such as dong quai, feverfew, supplemental garlic, and ginger could cause problems if taken before surgery as could herbs such as ginseng and licorice root that affect heart rate and blood pressure. Sedative herbs like kava and valerian may increase the effects of anesthesia. It is best to stop taking any of these herbs at least 10-14 days before surgery, and be sure to tell your physician that you’ve been taking them.

The aptly named bitter melon is thought to help cells use glucose more effectively and block sugar absorption in the intestine. When Philippine researchers had men and women take bitter melon in capsule form for three months, they had slight, but consistently, lower blood sugar than those taking a placebo. Gastrointestinal problems are possible side effects. You can reverse diabetes with these science-backed strategies.
×